The amygdala corticotropin-releasing factor steroids and stress

The amygdala is also involved in the modulation of memory consolidation . Following any learning event, the long-term memory for the event is not formed instantaneously. Rather, information regarding the event is slowly assimilated into long-term (potentially lifelong) storage over time, possibly via long-term potentiation . Recent studies suggest that the amygdala regulates memory consolidation in other brain regions. Also, fear conditioning , a type of memory that is impaired following amygdala damage, is mediated in part by long-term potentiation. [22] [23]

While antidepressants have been shown to regulate the response of the amygdala and can help in controlling anxiety, it is interesting to note that compassion meditation and mindfulness practice in Buddhist monks has also been observed to regulate the amygdala in a similar way, and that it was stronger in experienced monks than in novices. So, meditation is not only for New Age hippies, it does have a real impact on anxiety and reduces your fear response to situations and people. It is, without a doubt, a very effective tool to reverse an imbalanced neurological process.

Goleman later emphasised that "self-control is crucial...when facing someone who is in the throes of an amygdala hijack" [6] so as to avoid a complementary hijacking—whether in work situations, or in private life. Thus for example 'one key marital competence is for partners to learn to soothe their own distressed feelings...nothing gets resolved positively when husband or wife is in the midst of an emotional hijacking.' [7] The danger is that "when our partner becomes, in effect, our enemy, we are in the grip of an 'amygdala hijack' in which our emotional memory, lodged in the limbic center of our brain, rules our reactions without the benefit of logic or reason...which causes our bodies to go into a 'fight or flight' response." [8]

Several lines of evidence suggest an association between the amygdala and the modulation of aggressive behaviour. Previous morphometric brain imaging studies have focused on the role of the amygdala in the context of pathologic neuropsychiatric conditions like depression, personality disorders, and dysphoric and aggressive behaviour in epilepsy. In order to better understand the physiological role of the amygdala in modulating aggressive behaviour we investigated the relationship between amygdala volumes and lifetime aggression in healthy subjects.

The amygdala corticotropin-releasing factor steroids and stress

the amygdala corticotropin-releasing factor steroids and stress

Several lines of evidence suggest an association between the amygdala and the modulation of aggressive behaviour. Previous morphometric brain imaging studies have focused on the role of the amygdala in the context of pathologic neuropsychiatric conditions like depression, personality disorders, and dysphoric and aggressive behaviour in epilepsy. In order to better understand the physiological role of the amygdala in modulating aggressive behaviour we investigated the relationship between amygdala volumes and lifetime aggression in healthy subjects.

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